In 2016 the WalkFree foundation released their latest research report into slavery and they came to a number of 45.8 million people. Which is a staggering number, but still likely understated because it is an illegal and underground practice that we are discussing and so not something that can be accurately measured through a Gallup survey. In his 2013 paper, researcher Andrew Crane discusses how global businesses have garnered enormous power over the last 30 years, and have enjoyed a great number of savings opportunities as a result. What this means is that the business models that are currently accepted as normal allow modern slavery to continue to flourish. Even though it is largely universally illegal. We do this because we have a driving, underpinning economic focus, and this in turn drives the need to under-price major resources in production – a large component of which is labour.

Three things I learned about my life at home from the slums of Mumbai

Three things I learned about my life at home from the slums of Mumbai


Mumbai is a pretty exciting place – it’s vibrant, there is a lot of history, a long seaside promenade. But the slums, the dark side of Mumbai, that is a different story. The poverty, dirt, garbage, and human waste in the slums of Mumbai are impossible to describe in words. It has to be smelled to be believed. People live piled on top of each other, many have been trafficked from the poorest parts of India to work in slave like conditions in manual labour or the sex trade.

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Exploitation in the electronics industry – how does your brand rate?

Exploitation in the electronics industry – how does your brand rate?
Electronics has joined the long list of industries enjoying the gross profits afforded through the high prices of retailing their products and the low costs of production. Searching the world for the lowest cost materials and labour makes good business sense but really – at what human cost?

 

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Supply Chained - dirty secret of the tuna industry

Supply Chained - dirty secret of the tuna industry

Greenpeace is now beginning to focus on human rights violations in the supply chain.

In this week’s blog post we want to share a powerful report published by green peace exposing the truth about human rights violations in the Thai fishing industry, the tuna industry in particular. Its been widely reported for years that there is a myriad of human trafficking, forced labour and child labour in the workforce that harvests and processes tea, cotton, cocoa and coffee. Now the seafood industry is just emerging as an as another suspect. It’s not just Thailand either, the associated press won a journalism award recently for their work in uncovering the truth about slavery in the Indonesian fishing industry and the subsequent release of 2000 workers in forced labour conditions. You can read more about this here

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Seafood, Slavery and Sundays

Seafood, Slavery and Sundays

It’s a normal Sunday in the Nicholl household, pouring over newspapers and world events, household chores and the neverending meandering of my forever active mind. Because I’m too lazy to buy a dryer after just having moved house, I’m currently in the Laundromat waiting for my sheets to dry and listening to the sound of my own thoughts. Example internal dialogue transcript: Who actually carries $20 worth of $1 coins these days? I wonder if the lady in the IGA would be cross if I asked her for change for the dryer without buying anything. Must call dad to arrange fathers day events... My legs hurt from the gym…. But amongst the randomness, what I was really thinking about was about an article in The Age on Saturday, ‘Consumers in the dark on seafood origins’.

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Do you know who’s touched your food?

Do you know who’s touched your food?


Ever since the Nanna’s berries fiasco earlier on in the year, I find I have been looking at my food differently.

I have been buying things from the supermarket and I have been thinking, where has this been, who has touched it and how do you pronounce some of these ingredients? As a supply chain professional, it’s started me looking more closely at where the materials that go into our products originate.

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